return to  >  Buying

 

 

 



An Introduction To Brisbane

Brisbane is the capital and most populous city in Queensland, and the third most populous city in Australia. Brisbane's metropolitan area has a population of 2.3 million, and the South East Queensland urban conurbation, centred on Brisbane, encompasses a population of more than 3 million. The Brisbane central business district stands on the original European settlement and is situated inside a bend of the Brisbane River, about 15 kilometres from its mouth at Moreton Bay. The metropolitan area extends in all directions along the floodplain of the Brisbane River valley between Moreton Bay and the Great Dividing Range.

 

The metropolitan area sprawls across several of Australia's most populous local government areas, including the City of Brisbane, which is by far the most populous LGA in the nation. The demonym of Brisbane is Brisbanite.


One of the oldest cities in Australia, Brisbane was founded upon the ancient homelands of the Turrbal and Jagera peoples. Named after the Brisbane River on which it is located, which in turn was named after Scotsman Sir Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales from 1821 to 1825. The area was chosen as a place for secondary offenders from the Sydney Colony. A penal settlement was founded in 1824 at Redcliffe, 28 kilometres north of the central business district. That settlement was soon abandoned and moved to North Quay in 1825, and opened to free settlement in 1842.

 

The city was marred by Aboriginal conflict between 1843-1855, and development was partly setback by the Great Fire of Brisbane, and the Great Brisbane Flood. Brisbane was chosen as the capital when Queensland was proclaimed a separate colony from New South Wales in 1859. During World War II, Brisbane played a central role in the Allied campaign and served as the South West Pacific headquarters for General Douglas MacArthur. Today, it is well known for its distinct Queenslander Architecture which forms much of the built heritage of Brisbane.


Brisbane has hosted several large cultural, international and sporting events, including the 1982 Commonwealth Games, World Expo '88, the final Goodwill Games in 2001, and the 2014 G-20 summit.

 

 

Climate

 


Brisbane has a humid subtropical climate with hot, humid summers and dry moderately warm winters. Due to its proximity to the Coral Sea and a warm ocean current, Brisbane's overall temperature variability is somewhat less than most other Australian capitals, particularly in winter, when maximum temperatures below 20 C are relatively uncommon (compared with Sydney, Adelaide, and Perth). From November to March, thunderstorms are common over Brisbane, with the more severe events accompanied by large damaging hail stones, torrential rain and destructive winds. On an annual basis, Brisbane averages 124 clear days. Dewpoints in the summer average at around 20 C.

The city's highest recorded temperature was 43.2 C on 26 January 1940, but temperatures above 38 C are uncommon. On 19 July 2007, Brisbane's temperature fell below the freezing point for the first time since records began, registering −0.1 C at the airport. In 2009 Brisbane recorded its hottest winter day at 35.4 C on 24 August. Brisbane's wettest day occurred on 21 January 1887, when 465 millimetres of rain fell on the city, the highest maximum daily rainfall of Australia's capital cities.

From 2001 until 2010, Brisbane and surrounding temperate areas had been experiencing the most severe drought in over a century, with dam levels dropping to 16.9% of their capacity on 10 August 2007. Residents were mandated by local laws to observe level 6 water restrictions on gardening and other outdoor water usage. Per capita water usage is below 140 litres per day, giving Brisbane one of the lowest per capita usages of water of any developed city in the world. On 9 January 2011, an upper low crossed north of Brisbane and dropped rainfall on an already saturated southeast coast of Queensland, resulting in severe flooding and damage in Brisbane and the surrounding area; the same storm season also caused the water storage to climb to over 98% of maximum capacity and broke the drought.

Water restrictions have been replaced with water conservation measures that aim at a target of 200 litres per day/per person, but consumption is rarely over 160 litres. In November 2011, Brisbane saw 22 days with no recorded rainfall, which was the driest start to a November since 1919. Furthermore, August 2012 was the city's driest August and the driest month ever experienced in its recorded history (records at the Brisbane Airport commenced in 1929, although the station closed in February 2000). At the meteorological station in the city's downtown core (Brisbane Station), only 0.2 mm of precipitation was recorded in August 2012.

Brisbane also lies in the Tropical Cyclone risk area, although cyclones are rare. The last to affect Brisbane but not directly cross the city was Tropical Cyclone Hamish in March 2009: it remained 350 km north of Brisbane but caused significant damage to beaches as well as the worst oil spill in Moreton Bay. Average annual temperature of the sea is 24 C , from 21 C in July to 27 C in February. The city is susceptible to severe thunderstorms in the spring and summer months; on 16 November 2008 a severe storm caused tremendous damage in the outer suburbs, most notably The Gap. Roofs were torn off houses and hundreds of trees were felled.

More recently, on 27 November 2014, a very strong storm made a direct hit on the city centre. Described as 'the worst storm in a decade,' very large hail smashed skyscraper windows while a flash flood tore through the CBD. Wind gusts of 141 km/h were recorded in some suburbs, many houses were severely damaged, cars were destroyed and planes were flipped at the Brisbane and Archerfield Airports. Dust storms in Brisbane are extremely rare; on 23 September 2009, however, a severe dust storm blanketed Brisbane, as well as other parts of eastern Australia.

Climate data for Brisbane (19992014)

Month

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Record high C

40.0 41.7 37.9 33.7 30.7 29.0 28.2 35.4 35.1 38.7 38.9 40.0

Average high C

30.2 29.9 28.9 27.1 24.4 21.9 21.9 23.2 25.7 27.1 28.0 29.3

Average low C

21.5 21.3 20.0 17.3 13.5 11.7 10.1 10.7 13.7 16.3 18.7 20.3

Record low C

17.0 16.5 12.2 10.0 5.0 5.0 2.6 4.1 7.0 8.8 10.8 14.0

Average rainfall mm

153.9 133.0 105.8 65.8 58.5 57.6 24.7 42.1 28.8 72.5 106.6 138.7

Avg. precipitation days

12.4 12.6 14.3 11.9 10.0 9.2 7.2 5.4 7.3 8.9 11.7 13.2

Avg. relative humidity (%)

57 59 57 54 49 52 44 43 48 51 56 57

Source: Bureau of Meteorology

 

 

 


Brisbane is in the southeast corner of Queensland. The city is centred along the Brisbane River, and its eastern suburbs line the shores of Moreton Bay. The greater Brisbane region is on the coastal plain east of the Great Dividing Range. Brisbane's metropolitan area sprawls along the Moreton Bay floodplain from Caboolture in the north to Beenleigh in the south, and across to Ipswich in the south west. The city of Brisbane is hilly. The urban area, including the central business district, are partially elevated by spurs of the Herbert Taylor Range, such as the summit of Mount Coot-tha, reaching up to 300 metres and the smaller Enoggera Hill.

 

Other prominent rises in Brisbane are Mount Gravatt and nearby Toohey Mountain. Mount Petrie at 170 m and the lower rises of Highgate Hill, Mount Ommaney, Stephens Mountain and Whites Hill are dotted across the city. Also, on the west, are the higher Mount Glorious, (680 m), and Mount Nebo (550 m).

The city is on a low-lying floodplain. Many suburban creeks criss-cross the city, increasing the risk of flooding. The city has suffered three major floods since colonisation, in February 1893, January 1974, and January 2011. The 1974 Brisbane Flood occurred partly as a result of "Cyclone Wanda".

 

Heavy rain had fallen continuously for three weeks before the Australia Day weekend flood (2627 January 1974). The flood damaged many parts of the city, especially the suburbs of Oxley, Bulimba, Rocklea, Coorparoo, Toowong and New Farm. The City Botanic Gardens were inundated, leading to a new colony of mangroves forming in the City Reach of the Brisbane River.

Urban structure


The Brisbane central business district (CBD) lies in a curve of the Brisbane river. The CBD covers 2.2 km2 and is walkable. Central streets are named after members of the royal family. Queen Street is Brisbane's traditional main street. Streets named after female members (Adelaide, Alice, Ann, Charlotte, Elizabeth, Margaret, Mary) run parallel to Queen Street and Queen Street Mall (named in honour of Queen Victoria) and at right angles to streets named after male members (Albert, Edward, George, William). The city has retained some heritage buildings dating back to the 1820s. The Old Windmill, in Wickham Park, built by convict labour in 1824, is the oldest surviving building in Brisbane. The Old Windmill was originally used for the grinding of grain and a punishment for the convicts who manually operated the grinding mill. The Old Windmill tower's other significant claim to fame, largely ignored, is that the first television signals in the southern hemisphere were transmitted from it by experimenters in April 1934long before TV commenced in most places.

These experimental TV broadcasts continued until World War II. The Old Commissariat Store, on William Street, built by convict labour in 1828, was originally used partly as a grainhouse, has also been a hostel for immigrants and used for the storage of records. Built with Brisbane tuff from the nearby Kangaroo Point Cliffs and sandstone from a quarry near today's Albion Park Racecourse, it is now the home of the Royal Historical Society of Brisbane. It contains a museum and can also be hired for small functions. The city has a density of 379.4 people per square kilometre, which is high for an Australian city and comparable to that of Sydney. However like many western cities, Brisbane sprawls into the greater metropolitan area. This results from the fact that most of Brisbane's housing stock consists of detached houses.

Early legislation decreed a minimum size for residential blocks causing few terrace houses being constructed in Brisbane. Recently the density of the city and inner city neighbourhoods has increased with the construction of apartments, with the result that the population of the central business district has doubled over the last 5 years. The high density housing that historically existed came in the form of miniature Queenslander-style houses which resemble the much larger traditional styles but are sometimes only one quarter the size. These miniature Queenslanders are becoming scarce but can still be seen in the inner city suburbs.

Multi residence accommodations (such as apartment blocks) are relatively new to Brisbane, with few such blocks built before 1970, other than in inner suburbs such as New Farm. Pre-1950 housing was often built in a distinctive architectural style known as a Queenslander, featuring timber construction with large verandahs and high ceilings. The relatively low cost of timber in South-East Queensland meant that until recently most residences were constructed of timber, rather than brick or stone. Many of these houses are elevated on stumps (also called "stilts"), that were originally timber, but are now frequently replaced by steel or concrete. Brisbane is home to several of Australia's tallest buildings. Brisbane's tallest buildings are Infinity at 249 metres, Soleil at 243 metres, Aurora Tower at 207 metres, Riparian Plaza at 200 metres and One One One Eagle Street at 195 metres. 222 Margaret Street at 274 metres and 1 William Street at 260 metres are currently under construction.


 



Nineteenth century
Prior to European settlement, the Brisbane area was inhabited by the Turrbal and Jagera people. They knew the area that is now the central business district as Mian-jin, meaning "place shaped as a spike". The Moreton Bay area was initially explored by Matthew Flinders. On 17 July 1799, Flinders landed at what is now known as Woody Point, which he named "Red Cliff Point" after the red-coloured cliffs visible from the bay. In 1823 Governor of New South Wales Sir Thomas Brisbane instructed that a new northern penal settlement be developed, and an exploration party led by John Oxley further explored Moreton Bay.


Oxley discovered, named, and explored the Brisbane River as far as Goodna, 20 kilometres upstream from the Brisbane central business district. Oxley recommended Red Cliff Point for the new colony, reporting that ships could land at any tide and easily get close to the shore. The party settled in Redcliffe on 13 September 1824, under the command of Lieutenant Henry Miller with 14 soldiers (some with wives and children) and 29 convicts. However, this settlement was abandoned after a year and the colony was moved to a site on the Brisbane River now known as North Quay, 28 km (17 mi) south, which offered a more reliable water supply. Chief Justice Forbes gave the new settlement the name of Edenglassie before it was named Brisbane. Non-convict European settlement of the Brisbane region commenced in 1838.

 

German missionaries settled at Zions Hill, Nundah as early as 1837, five years before Brisbane was officially declared a free settlement. The band consisted of ministers Christopher Eipper (18131894) and Carl Wilhelm Schmidt and lay missionaries Haussmann, Johann Gottried Wagner, Niquet, Hartenstein, Zillman, Franz, Rode, Doege and Schneider. They were allocated 260 hectares and set about establishing the mission, which became known as the German Station.


Free settlers entered the area over the following five years and by the end of 1840 Robert Dixon began work on the first plan of Brisbane Town, in anticipation of future development. Queensland was separated from New South Wales by Letters Patent dated 6 June 1859, proclaimed by Sir George Ferguson Bowen on 10 December 1859, whereupon he became Queensland's first governor, with Brisbane chosen as its capital, although it was not incorporated as a city until 1902.

Twentieth century
Over twenty small municipalities and shires were amalgamated in 1925 to form the City of Brisbane, governed by the Brisbane City Council. 1930 was a significant year for Brisbane with the completion of Brisbane City Hall, then the city's tallest building and the Shrine of Remembrance, in ANZAC Square, which has become Brisbane's main war memorial. These historic buildings, along with the Story Bridge which opened in 1940, are key landmarks that help define the architectural character of the city.


During World War II, Brisbane became central to the Allied campaign when the AMP Building (now called MacArthur Central) was used as the South West Pacific headquarters for General Douglas MacArthur, chief of the Allied Pacific forces, until his headquarters were moved to Hollandia in August 1944. MacArthur had previously rejected use of the University of Queensland complex as his headquarters, as the distinctive bends in the river at St Lucia could have aided enemy bombers. Also used as a headquarters by the American troops during World War II was the T & G Building. About one million US troops passed through Australia during the war, as the primary co-ordination point for the South West Pacific. In 1942 Brisbane was the site of a violent clash between visiting US military personnel and Australian servicemen and civilians which resulted in one death and hundreds of injuries. This incident became known colloquially as the Battle of Brisbane.


Postwar Brisbane had developed a "big country town" stigma, an image the city's politicians and marketers were very keen to remove. In the late 1950s an anonymous poet known as The Brisbane Bard generated much attention on the city which helped shake this stigma. Despite steady growth, Brisbane's development was punctuated by infrastructure problems. The State government under Joh Bjelke-Petersen began a major program of change and urban renewal, beginning with the central business district and inner suburbs. Trams in Brisbane were a popular mode of public transport until the network was closed in 1969, leaving Melbourne as the last Australian city to operate a tram network until recently.


The 1974 Brisbane flood was a major disaster which temporarily crippled the city. During this era, Brisbane grew and modernised rapidly becoming a destination of interstate migration. Some of Brisbane's popular landmarks were lost, including the Bellevue Hotel in 1979 and Cloudland in 1982, demolished in controversial circumstances by the Deen Brothers demolition crew. Major public works included the Riverside Expressway, the Gateway Bridge, and later, the redevelopment of South Bank, starting with the Queensland Art Gallery.


Brisbane hosted the 1982 Commonwealth Games and the 1988 World Exposition (known locally as World Expo 88). These events were accompanied by a scale of public expenditure, construction and development not previously seen in the state of Queensland. Brisbane's population growth has exceeded the national average every year since 1990 at an average rate of around 2.2% per year.

Twenty-first century
After two decades of record population growth, Brisbane was hit again by a major flood in January 2011. The Brisbane River did not reach the same height as the previous 1974 flood but still caused extensive damage and disruption to the city. Brisbane also gained further international recognition, hosting the final Goodwill Games in 2001, more games than any other city in the 2003 Rugby World Cup, and the 2014 G-20 summit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of Brisbane

     

Inner suburbs

 

 

 

Bowen Hills

Highgate Hill

Paddington

Teneriffe

Brisbane

Kangaroo Point

Petrie Terrace

West End

East Brisbane

Kelvin Grove

Red Hill

Woolloongabba

Fortitude Valley

New Farm

South Brisbane

 

Herston

Newstead

Spring Hill

 

       

Northern suburbs

     

Albion

Chermside

Hendra

Pinkenba

Alderley

Chermside West

Kedron

Sandgate

Ascot

Clayfield

Keperra

Shorncliffe

Aspley

Deagon

Lutwyche

Stafford

Bald Hills

Eagle Farm

McDowall

Stafford Heights

Banyo

Everton Park

Mitchelton

Taigum

Boondall

Fitzgibbon

Myrtletown

Virginia

Bracken Ridge

Gaythorne

Newmarket

Wavell Heights

Bridgeman Downs

Geebung

Northgate

Wilston

Brighton

Gordon Park

Nudgee

Windsor

Brisbane Airport

Grange

Nudgee Beach

Wooloowin

Carseldine

Hamilton

Nundah

Zillmere

       

Southern suburbs

     

Acacia Ridge

Fairfield

Mount Gravatt

Sumner

Algester

Forest Lake

Mount Gravatt East

Sunnybank

Annerley

Greenslopes

Nathan

Sunnybank Hills

Archerfield

Heathwood

Pallara

Tarragindi

Burbank

Holland Park

Parkinson

Tennyson

Calamvale

Holland Park West

Richlands

Upper Mount Gravatt

Coopers Plains

Inala

Robertson

Wacol

Darra

Karawatha

Rochedale

Willawong

Doolandella

Kuraby

Rocklea

Wishart

Drewvale

Larapinta

Runcorn

Yeerongpilly

Durack

Macgregor

Salisbury

Yeronga

Dutton Park

Mackenzie

Seventeen Mile Rocks

 

Eight Mile Plains

Mansfield

Sinnamon Park

 

Ellen Grove

Moorooka

Stretton

 

       

 Eastern suburbs

     

Balmoral

Chandler

Manly

Ransome

Belmont

Coorparoo

Manly West

Seven Hills

Bulimba

Gumdale

Moreton Island

Tingalpa

Camp Hill

Hawthorne

Morningside

Wakerley

Cannon Hill

Hemmant

Murarrie

Wynnum

Carina

Lota

Norman Park

Wynnum West

Carindale

Lytton

Port of Brisbane

 

       

Western suburbs

     

Anstead

Enoggera Reservoir

Lake Manchester

Sherwood

Ashgrove

Ferny Grove

Middle Park

Sinnamon Park

Auchenflower

Fig Tree Pocket

Milton

St Lucia

Bardon

Graceville

Moggill

Taringa

Bellbowrie

Indooroopilly

Mount Coot-tha

The Gap

Brookfield

Jamboree Heights

Mount Crosby

Toowong

Chapel Hill

Jindalee

Mount Ommaney

Upper Brookfield

Chelmer

Karana Downs

Oxley

Upper Kedron

Chuwar

Kenmore

Pinjarra Hills

Westlake

Corinda

Kenmore Hills

Pullenvale

 

Enoggera

Kholo

Riverhills

 
       

Moreton Bay Region

     

Urban

     

Albany Creek

Cashmere

Kippa-Ring

Petrie

Arana Hills

Clontarf

Kurwongbah

Redcliffe

Banksia Beach

Dakabin

Lawnton

Rothwell

Beachmere

Deception Bay

Mango Hill

Sandstone Point

Bellara

Eatons Hill

Margate

Scarborough

Bongaree

Elimbah

Moodlu

Strathpine

Bray Park

Everton Hills

Morayfield

Upper Caboolture

Brendale

Ferny Hills

Murrumba Downs

Warner

Bunya

Godwin Beach

Narangba

Whiteside

Burpengary

Griffin

Newport

Woody Point

Caboolture

Joyner

Ningi

Woorim

Caboolture South

Kallangur

North Lakes

 

       

Rural

     

Armstrong Creek

D'Aguilar

Mount Delaney

Samsonvale

Bellmere

Dayboro

Mount Glorious

Stanmore

Bellthorpe

Delaneys Creek

Mount Mee

Stony Creek

Booroobin

Donnybrook

Mount Nebo

Toorbul

Bracalba

Draper

Mount Pleasant

Wamuran Basin

Camp Mountain

Highvale

Mount Samson

Wamuran

Campbells Pocket

Jollys Lookout

Neurum

Welsby

Cedar Creek

King Scrub

Ocean View

White Patch

Cedarton

Kobble Creek

Rocksberg

Wights Mountain

Clear Mountain

Laceys Creek

Rush Creek

Woodford

Closeburn

Meldale

Samford Valley

Yugar

Commissioners Flat

Moorina

Samford Village

 

 


 

 

Be the first to receive all of the latest listings and property news. 

 

 

Let The Memories Begin

 

 

 

 

Buying

Selling

Investing

About Us

For Sale

Why Choose Us

Investing In Property

About Us

Recent Sales

Testimonials

Understanding Risk

Our Team

Buying Tips

Market Appraisal

Investment Terms

Join Our Team

Buyers Guide

What A Vendor Wants

Investment Mistakes

Our Service Pledge

Buying At Auction

Free eBook

The Rule Of 72

Resources

Suburb Profiles

To Serve

Financial Planning Success

Contact Us

The Right Property

Agents To Avoid

Six Keys To Investing

 

Moving Tips

Is The Price Right

Simple Investment Rules

Follow Us

Finance

Marketing Plan

Planning For Your Future

 

Property News

The Selling Process

Negative Gearing

Checklists

Selling Tips

Investment Goals

 

Real Estate Glossary

Selling By Auction

Investing Glossary

 

Wish List

Selling Methods

Australian Income Statistics

 

Open Homes

Why Properties Don't Sell

First Home Buyers

 

 

Getting Your Home Ready

Investment Alert

 

 

How Do I Sell My Property

 

 

 

Marketing Options

 

 

 

Links   |   Privacy Policy   |   Disclaimer   |   Website Created By Elite Heat Web 2017